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Akira Avenue
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Dino's Burger.
Dionne Bridge
Disney Drive
Donna's Diner
Fairy Square
Ffordd Llyfr
Ha-Ha Arcade
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Jaimie's Zoo
J.J's Junction
Jo's Galleon
K. K's Square
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Lily's Yard
Monty's Circus
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Prudence Close
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Queen P Palace
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Diddily Dee Dot's Dreamland for Children Everywhere
Nonsense Avenue



Boy with Balloon

NONSENSE AVENUE


George, Who played with a Dangerous Toy,
and suffered a Catastrophe of Considerable Dimensions


By Hilaire BellocBalloon

When George’s Grandmamma was told
That George had been as good as gold,
She promised in the afternoon
To buy him an Immense BALLOON.
And so she did; but when it came,
It got into the candle flame,
And being of a dangerous sort
Exploded with a loud report!
The lights went out! The windows broke!
The room was filled with reeking smoke.
And in the darkness, shrieks and yells
Were mingled with electric bells,
And falling masonry and groans,
And crunching, as of broken bones,
And dreadful shrieks, when, worst of all,
The house itself began to fall!
It tottered, shuddering to and fro,
Then crashed into the street below -
Which happened to be Savile Row.

BalloonWhen help arrived, among the dead
Were Cousin Mary, Little Fred,
The Footmen (both of them), the Groom,
The man that cleaned the Billiard-Room,
The Chaplain, and the Still-Room Maid.
And I am dreadfully afraid
That Monsieur Champignon, the Chef,
Will now be permanently deaf -
And both his aides are much the same;
While George, who was in part to blame,
Received, you will regret to hear,
A nasty lump behind the ear.

Moral:
The moral is that little boys
Should not be given dangerous toys.




NO NONSENSE AVENUE
From Diddilydeedot's Dreamland

MUSIC TUTOR

Musical notes

 A TUTOR WHO TAUGHT ON THE FLUTE

TRIED TO TEACH TWO YOUNG TOOTERS TO TOOT.

SAID THE TWO TO THE TUTOR,

"IS IT HARDER TO TOOT, OR TO TUTOR TWO TOOTERS TO TOOT ?"


Noisy FeastNOISY FEAST

want to eat you up, gobble you up, cuddle you up, spread you on my toast

Want to give you nips, slurp my lips, waggle your hips, love you the most

Want to wobble you like jelly, blow raspberries on your belly, smiley and smelly, put you in a pie

Want to wiggle your knee, eat you for tea, squeeze you to me, my baby, the apple of my eye

By Laurelle Rond



Flapping Bat For Halloween

Halloween Flapping Bat from Kaboose

Green Poison Jar

Total Time Needed:
1 Hour

Looking for a festive decoration for your home this Halloween?

Try conjuring up a few of these flapping craft foam creatures.

Materials

Bat templates Diddilyies pet bat

Black craft foam
Red sequins
Black paper fasteners (or brass fasteners colored with permanent black marker)
10-inch piece of string or dental floss
Short piece of ribbon
A bead (optional)
Instructions
  1. Flapping Bat - Step 1

Click here to download a printable version of the flapping bat. To view the .pdf file, you'll need Acrobat Reader which is available for free from the Adobe site.


  1. Flapping Bat - Step 2

  2. Cut 1 body shape and 2 matching wing shapes from black craft foam, punching holes where indicated. Glue red sequins to the head for eyes.

  3.  


  1. Flapping Bat - Step 3

  2.  To attach the wings to the body, align the hole farthest from the rounded end of each wing with a shoulder hole. Use black paper fasteners (or brass fasteners colored with permanent black marker) to loosely attach the wings to the back of the body, as shown.



Next, thread one end of a 10-inch piece of string or dental floss through the remaining wing holes and tie it in a loose loop, making sure the free end extends beyond the bat's head. Tie a bead to the end of the string, if you like.

Tie a piece of ribbon through the hole at the bottom of the bat, then hang him upside down on a wall or window. To make the bat's wings flap, pull the hanging string.


 All Halloween Characters from www.familyfun.go.com



Red GeraniumsNO NONSENSE
from Diddilydeedot's Dreamland

This little rhyme comes from a wonderful man who sadly went to heaven a few years ago.
His name is Mervyn Peake and he wrote books and poetry, When you grow up, I am sure you will read about a place called "Gormanghast" and maybe even Mr. Pye, but today I am letting you read the rhyme called;

THE TROUBLE WITH GERANIUMS


The trouble with geraniums
is that they're much too red!
The trouble with my toast is that
it's far too full of bread.
Diamond
The trouble with a diamond
is that it's much too bright.
The same applies to fish and stars
and the electric light.
stars
The trouble with the stars I see
lies in the way they fly.
The trouble with myself is all
self-centred in the eye.
Through The Looking Glass. Illustrated by Mervyn Peake
The trouble with my looking glass
is that it shows me, me:
there's trouble in all sorts of things
where it should never be.

From A Book of Nonsense by Mervyn Peake (1911 - 1968.)
had to enclose a book cover of
Through the Looking Glass, Illustrated by Mervyn Peake.
He was also a marvellous Artist.
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NO NONSENSE
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Scarborough Fair

Henry III established a fair at Scarborough by charter in 1235.
It was held in the town until 1788 but is now only remembered in the famous folk song.


Scarborough Fair

Scarborough Fair

Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
Remember me to one who lives there;
For he once was a true love of mine.

A Cambric Shirt

Can you make me a cambric shirt?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
Without any seam, nor needlework;
Then you shall be a true love of mine.

Parsley




Can you wash it in yonder well?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
Which ne'er sprung water, nor rain e'er fell;
Then you shall be a true love of mine.

SageCan you dry it on yonder thorn?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
Which ne'er bore blossom since Adam was born;
Then you shall be a true love of mine.

Now you have asked me questions three.
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
Pray thee answer the same for me;
Then you shall be a true love of mine.


Rosemary


Can you find me an acre of land?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
Between the salt water and the sea sand;
Then you shall be a true love of mine.



Thyme

Can you plow it with a ram's horn?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
And sow it all over with one peppercorn;
Then you shall be a true love of mine.

Can you reap it with a sickle of leather?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
And tie it up with a peacock's feather;
Then you shall be a true love of mine.


Peacock's Feather


When you have done and finished your work?
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
Then come to me for your cambric shirt;
And you shall be a true love of mine.

Love imA Cambric Catposes impossible tasks.
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Although not more than any heart asks;
So you shall be a true love of mine.



Scarborough

Midi: Scarborough Fair


Share            A NO NONSENSE
                        COLLECTION OF SMALL CARTOONS JUST FOR YOU       

                     
                     CLICK ON ^THE VIDEO BOX IF ERROR SHOWS, BOX JUST BEING LAZY

Little Lulu

"Racing through the pantry, sliding on the floors,
Hiding in the closets, slamming all the doors
How can a lady as little as you,
Raise such a rumpus and a hullabaloo?

Refrain

"Little Lulu, Little Lulu, with freckles on your chin,
Always in and out of trouble, but mostly always in.
Using Daddy's necktie for the tail on your kite,
Using Mommy's lipstick for the letters you write.

"Though the clock says 7:30, it's really after 10;
Looks like Lulu's been repairing it again.
Though you're wild as any Zulu,
And you're just as hard to tame,
Little Lulu, I love you-Lu just the same, just the same,
Little Lulu, I love you-Lu just the same."

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NO NONSENSE FAIRY TALES
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 THE FAIRIES OF CALDON-LOW

And where have you been, my Mary,Fairy
            And where have you been from me ?
I've been to the top of Caldon-Low,
The midsummer night to see!

And what did you see, my Mary,
        All upon the Caldon-Low ?

I saw the glad sunshine come down,
And I saw the merry winds blow.

And what did you hear, my Mary,
        All up on the Caldon-Hill ?
I heard the drops of the water made,
And I heard the green corn fill.

Oh tell me all, my Mary,
        All,all that ever you know;
For you must have seen the fairies
Last night on the Caldon-Low !


Then take me on your knee, mother,

        And listen, mother of mine:
A hundred fairies danced last night,
And the harpers they were nine.

And the harp-strings rang so merrily
     To their dancing feet so small;
But. oh! the sound of their talking
     Was merrier far than all !

And what were the words, my Mary,
That you did hear them say ?
I'll tell you all, my mother,
     But let me have my way.

And some they played with the water,

     And some they rolled down hill;
And this, they said, shall speedily turn
The poor old miller's mill.

For there has been no water
       Ever since the first of May,
And a busy man will the miller be
  At the dawning of the day.

Oh! the miller, how he will laugh
     When he sees the mill-dam rise!
The jolly old miller, how he will laugh,
Till the tears fill both his eyes.


And some they seized the little winds

That sounded over the hill;
And each put a horn unto his mouth,
And blew both loud and shrill;


"And there,’ they said, ‘the merry winds go
Away from every horn;
And they shall clear the mildew dank
From the blind old widow’s corn.

"Oh! the poor, blind widow,
Though she has been blind so long,
She’ll be blithe enough when the mildew’s gone,
And the corn stands tall and strong,’

“And some they brought the brown lint-seed,
And flung it down from the Low;
‘And this!’ they said, ‘by the sunrise,

In the weaver’s croft shall grow.

"Oh! the poor, lame weaver,
How he will laugh outright
When he sees his dwindling flax-field
All full of flowers by night!’

“And then outspoke a brownie,
With a long beard on his chin;
‘I have spun up all the tow,’ said he,
‘And I want some more to spin.

"I’ve spun a piece of hempen cloth,
And I want to spin another;
A little sheet for Mary’s bed,
And an apron for her mother.’

“With that I could not help but laugh,
And I laugh’d out loud and free;
And then on the top of the Caldon Low
There was no one left but me.

“And all on the top of the Caldon Low
The mists were cold and gray,
And nothing I saw but the mossy stones
That round about me lay.

“But, coming down from the hill-top,
I heard afar below,
How busy the jolly miller was,
And how the wheel did go.

“And I peep’d into the widow’s field,
And, sure enough, were seen
The yellow ears of the mildew’d corn,

All standing stout and green.

“And down by the weaver’s croft I stole,
To see if the flax were sprung;
And I met the weaver at his gate,
With the good news on his tongue.

“Now this is all I heard, mother,
And all that I did see;
So, pr’ythee, make my bed, mother,
For I’m tired as I can be.”

This poem by Mary Howitt sets forth an old legend which tells us of the wonderful things you can see on a Midsummer night on the top of a hill which is supposed to be a special haunt  for the fairies. As boys and girls aren't allowed out of bed to go and see the fairies for themselves they have to dream about them instead. And so long as all you children believe in the fairies so their tales and legends will live forever.
***NO NONSENSE IN DREAMLAND ***
A LITTLE BIT OF "NO NONSENSE JUGGLING" JUST FOR YOU

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AND WITH A BIT OF LUCK , BY THE TIME THE SCHOOL HOLIDAYS ARE OVER YOU WILL ALL BE EXPERTS AT JUGGLING EVERYTHING. BUT DON'T USE MUM'S CUPS SHE WILL GO POTTY!

  Follow this site Beautiful Donkey, I have one I have adopted in Spain. And an Orangutan in Burma

Donkey Riding


Were you ever in Quebec
Stowin' timber on the deck?
where ye'd break yer aching neck
Riding on a donkey!


Riding on a Donkeychorus: Way O and away we go
Donkey riding, donkey riding
Way O and away we go
Riding on a donkey.



Were you ever off Cape Horn
Donkey Riding
Where it's always fine and warm?
Where's there's a lion and a unicorn
Riding on a donkey.

chorus: Way O and away we go



Were you ever in Cardiff Bay
Where the folks all shout, "Hooray!"?
"Here comes Johnny with his six months pay
Riding on a donkey."

chorus: Way O and away we go


Riding on a DonkeyWere you ever in Timbucktoo
Where the gals are black and blue?
And they wriggle their arses, too
Riding on a donkey.

chorus: Way O and away we go



Were you ever in Vallipo
Donkey Riding
Where the gals put on a show?
Wriggle their arse with a roll and go

Riding on a donkey.

chorus: Way O and away we go


Wuz ye ever down Mobile Bay
Screwin' cotton all the day?,
 A dollar a day is a white man's pay.
Ridin' on a donkey.

chorus: Way O and away we go


Riding on a Donkey
Wuz ye ever in Canton
Where the men wear pigtails long,
And the gals play hong-ki-kong?
Ridin' on a donkey.

chorus: Way O and away we go

Wuz ye ever in Mirramashee
Where ye tie up to a tree,
An' the skeeters do bite we?
Ridin' on a donkey

chorus: Way O and away we go


Donkey RidingWuz ye ever on the Broomielaw
Where the Yanks are all the go,
An' the boys dance heel an' toe?
Ridin' on a donkey.


chorus: Way O and away we go


I used to love singing this song.

Donkey Riding

[GIF Score]

                   Beautiful Donkey, I have one I have adopted in Spain. And an Orangutan in Burma
Thanks to, http://sniff.numachi.com/  For providing me with the tune
(Who Thanks to Mudcat for the Digital Tradition!)


A PHENOMINAL WEB PAGE FOR MUSIC AND WORDS FROM  A -Z

Digital Tradition Mirror

DISCLAIMER Disclaimer: This website contains materials authored by me and also partly a collection of items from the internet. The collections are, I believe, in the Public Domain. In case any material, inadvertently put up, which has a copyright please do write to me and it will be removed. The compilations are for entertainment purposes only and have not been compiled for educational or historical purposes.


 


A Memory

A few Poems by William Allingham, 1824-1889

Four ducks on a pond,
A grass-bank beyond,
A blue sky of spring,
White clouds on the wing;
What a little thing
To remember for years-
To remember with tears!

Swing, swing Sing, sing,
Here! my throne and I am a king!
Far, far, Over the bar,
Sweeping daisies with my toe.
Slow, slow, To and fro,
.Swing, swing.Sing, sing,
Farewell, earth for I'm on the wing!
Low, high, Here I fly,
Like a bird through sunny sky;
Free, free, Over the lea,
Over the mountain, over the sea!
Soon, soon, Afternoon,
Over the sunsunset, over the moon;
Slow - slow - slow - slow.

The Fairies.
Up the airy mountain, Down the rushy glen,
We daren't go a-hunting for fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk, trooping all together;
Green jacket, red cap, and white owl's feather!

Down along the rocky shore some make their home,
They live on crispy pancakes of yellow tide-foam;
Some in the reeds o Of the black mountain lake,
With frogs for their watch-dogs, all night awake.
High on the hill-top

The old King sits; he is now so old and gray
He's nigh lost his wits.With a bridge of white mist
Columbkill he crosses, on his stately journeys
From Slieveleague to Rosses; or going up with music

On cold starry nights, 'to sup with the Queen
Of the gay Northern Lights. They stole little Bridget
For seven years long; when she came down again
Her friends were all gone. They took her lightly back,

Between the night and morrow, they thought that she was fast asleep,

But she was dead with sorrow. They have kept her ever since
Deep within the lake, on a bed of flag-leaves,
Watching till she wake. By the craggy hill-side,


Through the mosses bare,
they have planted thorn-trees

For pleasure here and there. Is any man so daring
As dig them up in spite, he shall find their sharpest thorns in his bed at night.

Up the airy mountain, down the rushy glen,
We daren't go a-hunting for fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk, trooping all together;
Green jacket, red cap, and white owl's feather!


These three wonderful poems came from the pen of the brilliant William Allingham

He loved poetry from an early age and we are told he would wander about Ballyshannon in the evening, listening to the girls singing old ballads at their cottage doors. He transcribed these ballads, and changed them to his liking and then had them printed in broadsheet form to sell in the locality.

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TEST OF GENIUS

Ask your friends to read this sentence slowly:

"Finished files are the result of years of scientific
 study combined with the experience of years."

Then tell them to count out aloud, ONLY ONCE,
the number of F's in the sentence.

The answer is at the bottom of
"Light the Lamps up, Lamplighter."



 LIGHT THE LAMPS UP, LAMPLIGHTER

(For a Lamplighter, a Grandmother,
the Angel Gabriel, and Any Number of Others)


Light the lamps up Lamplighter,
The people are in the street -
Without a light
They have no sight,
And where will they plant their feet?
Some will tread in the gutter,
And some in the mud - oh, dear!
Light the lamps up, Lamplighter,
Because the night is here.

Light the candles, Grandmother,
The children are going to bed -
Without a wick
They'll stumble and stick,
And where will they lay their head?
Some will lie on the staircase,
And some in the hearth - oh, dear!
Light the candles, Grandmother,
Because the night is here.


Light the stars up, Gabriel,
The cherubs are out to fly -
If heaven is blind
How will they find
Their way across the sky?
Some will splash in the Milky Way,
Or bump on the Moon - oh, dear!
Light the stars up, Gabriel,
Because the night is here.

This beautiful poem was written by
Eleanor Farjeon.
I have enclosed this little piece of information about her, do go to the links,
she really was a wonderful lady and I remember when she died.

Eleanor Farjeon (February 13, 1881June 5, 1965) was an English author of children's stories and plays, poetry, biography, history and satire. Some of her correspondence has also been published.
 She won many literary awards and the prestigious Eleanor Farjeon Award for children's literature is presented annually in her memory by the Children's Book Circle, a society of publishers.

Her work is cited as an influence by famous Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki.sadly now passed away.

The answer to "Test of Genius".
A person of average intelligence finds three F's. If you spotted four you're above average.
If you got five, you can turn up your nose at almost anybody in the street. However if you caught all six you're probably a genius and you ought not to waste your time takking tests like this. :)


And below - Just a little something nice to read;

And I said to the man who stood at the gate of the year:
`Give me a light that I may tread safely into the unknown.‘
And he replied: `Go out into the darkness and put your hand into the hand of God.
That shall be to you better than light and safer than a known way.‘

 from `The Desert ‘ by Minnie Louise Haskins.
Quoted by King George VI in his Christmas Day broadcast, 1939.

ODDBODS"
 soft jelly baby

The Jelly Baby, the Smartie and the Lockets

A Jelly Baby walks into a bar and starts talking to a Smartie. After a few beers the Smartie says, "Ere, a bunch of us are heading to that new club, fancy tagging along?"

The Jelly Baby says, "No mate, I'm a soft centre, I always end up getting my head kicked in."

So Smartie says, "Don't worry about it, I'm a bit of a hard case, I'll look after you."

Jelly Baby thinks about it for a minute and says, "Fair enough, as long as you'll look after me", and off they go.


After a few more beers in the club, three Lockets walk in. As soon as he sees them, Smartie hides under the table.

The Lockets take one look at Jelly Baby and start kicking him, breaking cola bottles over his little jelly head, lamping him with little sugary chairs, and generally having a laugh. After a while they get bored and walk out.

Jelly Baby pulls his battered Jelly Baby body over to the table and wipes up his Jelly Baby blood and turns to Smartie and says, "I thought you were going to look after me."

I was!" says Smartie,

"But those Lockets are  ment(h)al

I Had a Cat



I had a cat and the cat pleased me;
 I fed my cat by yonder tree.
Cat goes fiddle-i-fee


I had a hen and the hen pleased me;

  I fed my hen by yonder tree.
Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,
Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.


I had a duck and the duck pleased me;
I fed my duck by yonder tree.
Duck goes quack, quack,
Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,

Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.

I had a goose and the goose pleased me;
I fed my goose by yonder tree.
 Goose goes swishy, swashy,
Duck goes quack, quack,
Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,
Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.

I had a sheep and the sheep pleased me,
I fed my sheep by yonder tree;
Sheep goes baa, baa,
Goose goes swishy, swashy,
Duck goes quack, quack,
Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,
Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.



I had a pig and the pig pleased me;
I fed my pig by yonder tree.

Pig goes griffy, gruffy,
Sheep goes baa, baa,
Goose goes swishy, swashy,

Duck goes quack, quack,
Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,
Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.

PiggyI had a cow and the cow pleased me;

I fed my cow by yonder tree.
Cow goes moo, moo,
Pig goes griffy, gruffy,
Sheep goes baa, baa,
Goose goes swishy, swashy,

Duck goes quack, quack,
Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,
Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.

I had a horse and the horse pleased me;
I fed my horse by yonder tree.
Horse goes neigh, neigh,
Cow goes moo, moo,
Pig goes griffy, gruffy,
Sheep goes baa, baa,

Goose goes swishy, swashy,
Duck goes quack, quack,
Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,

Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.

I had a dog and the dog pleased me;

I fed my dog by yonder tree.Piglet
Dog goes bow-wow, bow-wow,
Horse goes neigh, neigh,

Cow goes moo, moo,
Pig goes griffy, gruffy,
 Sheep goes baa, baa,
Goose goes swishy, swashy,
 Duck goes quack, quack,

  Hen goes chimmy-chuck, chimmy-chuck,
Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.



 

The End

 
IN CASE YOU ARE FEELING A LITTLE BIT FED UP AND BORED.
HERE ARE A FEW JOKES YOU CAN SHARE WITH YOUR FRIENDS AT SCHOOL.
I would also like you to join in with me to CONGRATULATE SELIGOR'S CASTLE of being given the new grade of 8 OUT OF TEN. Isn't that fantastic, hopefully we will have an upgrade here in Dreamland one day. I hope so. So lets give a big cheer for Seligor and Diddily Dee Dot but mainly all the lovely people who pay us a visit every day.
HIP, HIP, HIP, HOORAY.


 Q. What do swamp monsters like for tea?

A. Beings on toast!
Q. What do you get if you cross a biscuit with a car tyre?
A. Crumbs

Q. What did the donut say to the loaf of bread?
A. If I had that much dough, I wouldn't be hanging around this hole.

Q. What's the fastest cake in the world?
A. Meriiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnnnngue.

Q. What cake wanted to rule the world?
A. Attila the Bun.

Q. Why'd the boy eat his homework?
A. His teacher told him it was a piece of cake!


Q. What do you call a witches broomstick when you are very young?

A. A broom broom!

Q. What do you get if you cross a jogger with an apple pie?
A. Puff pastry


Q. What do policeman have in their sandwiches?
A. Truncheon Meat!

Q. What do you get if you cross a madman and a bakery?
A. Doughnuts

Q. What do you get if you cross a cake and a disco?
A. Abundance!

Q. What do you call the flour that fairies make bread with?
A. Elf raising flour!


Q. Why do idiots eat biscuits?
A. Because they're crackers!

Q. What do elves eat at parties?
A. Fairy cakes!


Q. Why did the lazy man want a job in a bakery?
A. So he could loaf around!

Q. Why does the school cook dip the sponge fingers in paraffin?
A. In an attempt to make them light!
 
PETER  - BOOM - BOOM

 



 WEE WILLIE WINKIE

Wee Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs in his night-gown,
Tapping at the window, crying at the lock,
"Are all the children in theirbeds, for tis ten o'clock?"

"Hey! Willie Winkie are you coming then?
The cat's singing purrie to the sleeping hen;
The dog is lying on the floor, and does not even peep;
And here's a wakeful little boy that will not fall asleep.



"Anything but sleep, you rogue! Staring like the moon;
Rattling in an iron job with an iron spoon;
Rumbling, tumbling all about, crowing like a cock,
Screaming like I don't know what, Waking sleeping folk.

"Hey! Willie Winkie, Can't you keep him still?
Wriggling off a body's knee, like a very eel;
Pulling at the cat's ear, as she drowsy hums:
Hey, Willie Winkie! See! here he comes."



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